NASA Ames Pilot Project in Florida

In California, researchers with the NASA Ames Research Center at Moffett Field are advancing in plans to deploy an ocean-based algal fuels platform. The OMEGA project deploys flexible floating plastic bags, up to a quater-acre in size – pumped with wastewater and then cleansed and harvested by barges every ten days.

The bags would release purified water via membranes on the sids of the quarter-acre bags. The project, which has received support from Google, the California Energy Commission, and NASA, is aiming towards a pilot-scale version in closed ponds, with locations near San Francisco and Santa Cruz in future deployments.

Nevada-based Algae Systems has licensed the technology and is developing a project in Tampa Bay, Florida. Looks like Omega project is drawing a lot of attention.

Read More: http://bit.ly/5yfYHP

NASA Ames Research Center makes biofuel from wastewater

NASA has thrown its weight behind a clever method of growing algae in wastewater for the purpose of making biofuel.onathan Trent, a bioengineer at NASA Ames Research Center in Moffett Field, Calif comments that the forward-osmosis membranes OMEGA only release fresh water into the ocean, and dont permit salty water to contaminate the bags.

Such a process would mainly rely on the energy of the ocean waves to mix the algae, as well as sunlight and carbon dioxide. The offshore locations and the wide oceans would also have more than enough room to grow massive amounts of algae needed to produce biofuels for an energy-hungry world.

One possible future plan would combine the algae-growth system with a gigantic offshore wind farm being built by Germany, Sweden and Denmark. Wind power could then provide lights to keep algae growing underwater and during the nighttime hours – a fitting vision for the sustainable future of spaceship Earth.

Its renewable carbon negative fuel from algae making use of sunlight,sewage and co2 – a solution for today’s problem.

Read More: http://bit.ly/4quZQy

NASA – Growing algae underwater?

NASA Ames Research Center makes biofuel from wastewater..

NASA has thrown its weight behind a clever method of growing algae in wastewater for the purpose of making biofuel.onathan Trent, a bioengineer at NASA Ames Research Center in Moffett Field, Calif comments that the forward-osmosis membranes OMEGA only release fresh water into the ocean, and dont permit salty water to contaminate the bags.

Such a process would mainly rely on the energy of the ocean waves to mix the algae, as well as sunlight and carbon dioxide. The offshore locations and the wide oceans would also have more than enough room to grow massive amounts of algae needed to produce biofuels for an energy-hungry world.

One possible future plan would combine the algae-growth system with a gigantic offshore wind farm being built by Germany, Sweden and Denmark. Wind power could then provide lights to keep algae growing underwater and during the nighttime hours – a fitting vision for the sustainable future of spaceship Earth.

Its renewable carbon negative fuel from algae making use of sunlight,sewage and co2-a solution for today’s problem!

Read more: http://bit.ly/4quZQy

NASA’s Algae bioreactor – more info

NASA Uses Algae to Turn Sewage Into Fuel:

NASA may concern itself largely with space exploration, but it also wants to keep Earth on a steady course in the face of rising energy costs and climate change. Now the U.S. space agency has thrown its weight behind a clever method of growing algae in wastewater for the purpose of making biofuel.

NASA’s Bioreactor Cleans Wastewater too

NASA’s bioreactor grows Algae and Cleans Wastewater:

NASA invented an algae photo-bioreactor that grows algae in municipal wastewater to produce biofuel and a variety of other products. They estimate that 10 acres of ocean could produce 21 billion gallons of biofuel each year–enough for all U.S. aviation needs. A number of airlines have already begun to test out biofuels, including Continental Airlines, Virgin Atlantic, and Air New Zealand.

The NASA bioreactor is an Offshore Membrane Enclosure for Growing Algae (OMEGA), which won’t compete with agriculture for land, fertilizer, or freshwater.

When deployed in contaminated and “dead zone” coastal areas, this system may help remediate these zones by removing and utilizing the nutrients that cause them. The forward-osmosis membranes use relatively small amounts of external energy compared to the conventional methods of harvesting algae, which have an energy intensive de-watering process.

Potential benefits include oil production from the harvested algae, and conversion of municipal wastewater into clean water before it is released into the ocean. After the oil is extracted from the algae, the algal remains can be used to make fertilizer, animal feed, cosmetics, or other valuable products.

That is not all!

This successful spinoff of NASA-derived technology will help support the commercial development of a new algae-based biofuels industry and wastewater treatment.

More: http://bit.ly/6nXs9q

Investing in Algae to biofuel

Hundreds of millions of years ago, the earth was covered with shallow oceans filled with algae and other simple critters.

As landmasses shifted and grew, water was displaced, leaving thick masses of algal residue that were eventually buried and compressed.

Skip forward a few eons, throw in some heat and pressure and ta-da! Oil.

Then, in 1859, Colonel Drake drilled the first oil well in Titusville, PA, unleashing not only oil but an economic juggernaut that would dictate our way of life for years to come.

The world began to use oil for everything from fuel to waterproofing, and since then has consumed over a trillion barrels. With such furious consumption — and no way to make more — world oil reserves are set to dwindle.

Essentially, we’re going to deplete in less than 300 years what took hundreds of millions of years to form. And with the depletion of oil, alternatives are destined to emerge.

And ironically. . . algae is one of them.

Biofuel Bliss:

Research like that being done at the Colorado State University’s (CSU), Engines and Energy Conservation Laboratory and the University of New Hampshire (UNH), suggests that algae could supply enough fuel to meet all of America’s transportation needs in the form of biodiesel.

That’s right . . . all of it.

Whereas with our current biodiesel feedstocks, like soy and palm, there’s no way we could grow enough to supply all of our transportation needs.

In fact, it would actually require twice the land area of the United States devoted to soybean production to meet current heating and transportation needs.

That’s a lot of beans!

Algae, on the other hand, could supply all U.S. diesel power using a mere 0.2% of the nation’s land.

In fact, enough algae can be grown to replace all transportation fuels in the U.S. on only 15,000 square miles, or 9.6 million acres of land.

That’s about the size of the state of Maryland.

Granted, that still may sound like a lot of land. . . but consider that we now use 938 million acres for farmland in the U.S.

I’d show you a pie chart of how much land would be required for algae growth — but the slice is so tiny, it wouldn’t even be visible.

So now the question is, how the heck can you make so much biodiesel from such a small amount of algae?

Well, let’s revert back to ninth-grade science class for a moment. . .

Biofuels are really a form of solar energy. Because crops convert solar energy into chemical energy in a process called (anyone? anyone?). . . photosynthesis.

It’s this chemical energy, in the form of oils, that we need to produce biofuels.

According to the UNH report, the more efficient a particular plant is at converting solar energy into chemical energy, the better it is from a biofuels perspective.

So in this area, algae’s the clear winner.

In fact, algae does this so well that up to 50% of its body weight can be fat, or the oil needed to make biodiesel.

That makes algae the highest-yielding feedstock for biodiesel, producing 24 times more oil per acre, on average, than the next leading feedstock — palm oil at 635 gallons/acre/year:

And some companies have far surpassed the 15,000 gallon per acre-accepted benchmark.

In fact, one company can produce 180,000 gallons of biodiesel every year from just one acre of algae. That comes to about 4,000 barrels, at a cost of $25 per barrel or $.59 per gallon.

To put that in perspective, it takes 3,750 acres of soy to make the same amount of biodiesel at a cost of about $2.50 per gallon for 4,000 barrels.

So, how is this going to be done?

Algae Profits Bloom:

It is possible to use human sewage and wastewater from agricultural endeavors to enhance the growth of algae.

In fact, when done right, algae can double and even triple overnight with the addition of these fertilizers.

Compare that to the five-month growing season for soy or canola!

Plus, as algae absorbs Co2 from the air as it grows. MIT has even fed emissions from their on-site power plant directly to algae being cultivated for biofuel production.

In addition, fertilizer for other food crops can be produced by using the leftover nutrients that aren’t used to make the biofuel.

That’s like having your algae and eating it too.

So let’s back up and look at the big picture. . .

We have the technology right now to cultivate algae that can be used as fuel, using human and animal waste as fertilizer.

This is waste that would otherwise need to be treated, or it will end up in our nation’s groundwater.

Not a bad deal at all!

After the necessary oils have been extracted from the algae, we use the byproducts (phosphorus and nitrogen), as fertilizer for the food crops that feed the nation — all while extracting C02 from the air.

That’s a beautiful thing.

And that’s why we’re currently looking at a number of companies . . . some public, some soon-to-go-public . . . that we believe will capitalize in a big, big way on algae.

Source: http://bit.ly/7jRUmu