Algae the New Oil – 2010 Forecast

The Futurist’s Magazine’s Top 10 forecasts for 2010 says Algae may become the new oil. According to researchers at a Department of Energy plant in New Mexico, single-celled microalgae, grown in pond water, produce a biofuel that is lead-free and biodegradable, emits two-thirds less carbon dioxide and other pollutants than gasoline, and can run any modern diesel engine. Even better, algae require only a fraction of the land area of biofuel-producing crops.

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Algae Biodiesel – Fuel of the 21st century

The potential of biodiesel to revolutionize our energy industry is enormous, not to mention the economic opportunities for farming nations that depend on the agricultural industry to survive. Many of these nations have begun to plant many acres of oil rich crops that are then sold to make biodiesel all over the world.

The real opportunity for biodiesel to save our energy dependent society lies in algae. Algae has proven to be capable of a higher yield per acre of biodiesel convertible oil than any other plant. With time and effective engineering of an efficient algae farming method, we will be able to utilize the solar energy more efficiently than ever, and we will easily be able to answer the worlds energy needs with biodiesel.

Biodiesel may not be the holy grail of energy sources, but it comes pretty close in these times of oil wars and a rapidly depleted ozone layer. Perhaps you should look into biodiesel as your personal alternative fuel today. The more informed we are as a society, the brighter the future may be for our children.

What’s more Biodiesel is not the fuel of tomorrow, I dare to say it is the fuel of today.

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NASA Ames Research Center makes biofuel from wastewater

NASA has thrown its weight behind a clever method of growing algae in wastewater for the purpose of making biofuel.onathan Trent, a bioengineer at NASA Ames Research Center in Moffett Field, Calif comments that the forward-osmosis membranes OMEGA only release fresh water into the ocean, and dont permit salty water to contaminate the bags.

Such a process would mainly rely on the energy of the ocean waves to mix the algae, as well as sunlight and carbon dioxide. The offshore locations and the wide oceans would also have more than enough room to grow massive amounts of algae needed to produce biofuels for an energy-hungry world.

One possible future plan would combine the algae-growth system with a gigantic offshore wind farm being built by Germany, Sweden and Denmark. Wind power could then provide lights to keep algae growing underwater and during the nighttime hours – a fitting vision for the sustainable future of spaceship Earth.

Its renewable carbon negative fuel from algae making use of sunlight,sewage and co2 – a solution for today’s problem.

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Algae buildings solves Climate issues?

Algae buildings solves Climate issues? The future of green technology is algae-cultivating buildings, synthetic trees, and heaps of white roofs, according to the U.K.’s institution of Mechanical Engineers. Andrew McFaul. Cultivating algae to make liquid fuel is one of the most active areas of study in biofuels. The institution is recommending that algae be amalgamated into buildings so algae can be grown at a big scale. How synthetic trees, which capture carbon from the air, could be deployed alongside wind turbines. Engineers envision that long plastic tubes, called photobioreactors, be integrated into building designs or retrofitted onto existing skyscrapers. Energy Secretary Steven Chu has in public offered this comparatively low-tech approach, which was studied in-depth at the Lawrence Livermore lab last year. The shape of things to come?Climate issues fixed by these a;gae covered buildings. labels:algae -cul tivating buildings- Andrew mcfaul

http://www.readthewriting.com/post/andrew-mcfaul-algae-coated-buildings-touted-as-climate-fix/

Filler up with microalgae

Biofuels Technologies Enterprises) of Cheyenne, Wyo. intends to commercialize a patent pending technology called direct liquefaction that produces bio-crude oil in a generator from biomass like wood, grass and cooking oils.

Titan Worldwide Inc. has signed a partnership deal with U.S. BTE bio-crude oil producer to help develop and manufacture a commercial refineries to make diesel fuel from biomass. Titan president/CEO Jay Currie calls the business potential for his firm “enormous” if their manufacturing deal with BTE (Biofuels Technologies Enterprises) of Cheyenne, Wyo. becomes reality.

Currie said the ideal biomass material is micro-algae which can be harvested easily can sustainably regrow itself within hours, has a high energy content and has as much as 86 per cent lower emissions than fossil fuel.

If microalgae could replace wood and cooking oil it would be the ideal biomass. Hope it materialises soon.

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Solazyme – Top Company in Bioenergy

Solazyme, Inc., a renewable oil and bioproducts company using algal biotechnology, is ranked number one among the 2009-10 “50 Hottest Companies in Bioenergy” rankings, published today in Biofuels Digest, the world’s most widely read biofuels daily. The award, which more than 1400 companies were eligible for, recognizes innovation and achievement in bioenergy.

“It’s an honor for Solazyme to be selected for this award in such an important industry publication,” said Jonathan Wolfson, CEO, Solazyme. “Our team works hard every day to address the world’s critical need for energy alternatives, and to be recognized for our achievements is fantastic.”

Solazyme achieved a number of milestones in 2009 in its quest to use microalgae biotechnology to produce clean and scalable fuels, “green” chemicals, nutritionals and wellness products. Notable achievements include:

Closing a $57 million Series C financing round:
Winning two U.S. Department of Defense Navy contracts for jet fuel and ship fuel which constitute the largest quantity of fuel derived from algae or any microbial fuel to date  Completing a “field-to-wheels” carbon dioxide analysis which concluded that Solazyme’s algal biofuel, Soladiesel reduces greenhouse gas emissions 85 to 93 percent when compared with petroleum-based diesel.

Being awarded a California Energy Commission PIER grant to develop fuel from cellulosic material. Announcing a formal commitment to commercialize algal renewable oil production technology for food and fuel at the 2009 Clinton Global Initiative.

Welcoming energy and government experts R. James Woolsey, TJ Glauthier and Donald Kennedy to Solazyme’s leadership team.

In 2009, Solazyme also took home the San Francisco Business Times’ Bay Area Green Business Award in Renewable Fuels, the TiE50 Top Cleantech Start-Up award, was named to the UK Guardian Global Cleantech 100 and was one of two companies presented with the “Green Leap” distinction at the Clinton Global Initiative.

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Algae-Saving Protein Found

Researchers at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have identified the protein LHCSR as the molecular ‘dimmer switch’ that acts to prevent green algae from absorbing too much sunlight during photosynthesis and suffering oxidation damage as a consequence.

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