Algae buildings solves Climate issues

The future of green technology is algae-cultivating buildings, synthetic trees, and heaps of white roofs, according to the U.K.’s institution of Mechanical Engineers. Andrew McFaul.

Cultivating algae to make liquid fuel is one of the most active areas of study in biofuels. The institution is recommending that algae be amalgamated into buildings so algae can be grown at a big scale.

How synthetic trees, which capture carbon from the air, could be deployed alongside wind turbines.

Engineers envision that long plastic tubes, called photobioreactors, be integrated into building designs or retrofitted onto existing skyscrapers.

Energy Secretary Steven Chu has in public offered this comparatively low-tech approach, which was studied in-depth at the Lawrence Livermore lab last year.

The shape of things to come?Climate issues fixed by these algae covered buildings.

Read More: http://bit.ly/73XIdx

Aurora Biofuels leases Algae ponds

Aquacarotene Ltd,Perth based company said it had agreed to sell its leases and licences at its algae ponds in Karratha to US-based Aurora Biofuels for $2 million plus a 15-year gross revenue royalty of 2 per cent.

California-based Aurora would now start a pilot project at Karratha. It planned that construction of a full facility would happen by 2012 and the full project to produce algae for bio-diesel would be operational by 2013.

Keen interest in algae fuels grows.

Read More: http://bit.ly/7MHHOv

First commercial scale Algae farm in USA

In Texas, PetroSun will open the first US commercial-scale algae farm for biofuels near South Padre Island.

The 1,831 acre site includes 157 separate ponds, and the company said that extraction of algae from water and oil from algae were studied and solved at the company’s pilot farm in Opelika, Alabama. PetroSun said that results from the pilot farm demonstrated a yield of between 5,000 and 8,000 gallons per acre, or a potential oil production of 9-15 Mgy at the South Padre Island facility.

Algae-based research and development continues to pick up in pace, even though the US Defense Department is estimating that the current production cost of algae oil exceeds $20 per gallon.

Recent developments include:

Netherlands, AlgaeLink announced a new process for extracting algae without using chemicals, drying or an oil press.

The company said that its patent-pending technique uses 26 kilowatts of power to produce 12,000 gallons of algae oil per hour, with a yield of 50 percent from the initial algae paste.

In Texas, the state’s Emerging Technology Fund will provide $4 million to Texas AgriLife Research and General Atomics to conduct microalgae research and development.

In Virginia, researchers at Old Dominion University have successfully piloted a project to produce biodiesel feedstock by growing algae at municipal sewage treatment plants. The pilot project is producing up to 70,000 gallons of biodiesel per year.

In Minnesota, Xcel Energy has pledged $150,000 to assist in funding an algae-to-biodiesel research project sponsored by the University and the Metropolitan Council.

The US Department of Energy recently partnered with Chevron in a research effort to develop higher-yield strains of micro algae.

The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency is working on a project with Honeywell, General Electric and the University of North Dakota.

In Texas, US Sustainable Energy is awaiting lab results from a test of biocrude production using 20 pounds of algae as a feedstock. The company recently ran its initial test of 20 pounds of 5% oil-content algae feedstock with 40 percent water content, and resulted in an ignitable oil product.

This is just the tip of the iceberg.

A lot more action is expected in the future.

Read More: http://bit.ly/7NFp1u

The Algae Room

The Algae Room

Humble algae could become the hottest wallcovering of the future if studioJonandNina have anything to do with it. ‘The Algae Room’ was on show during Tokyo Designers Week and in it visitors were asked to sit back and bask in the cool green glow of fermenting algae, chomp on some Nori and contribute a touch of CO2 to the bioreactor via a facemask. Intended as a means of producing domestic fuel, the algae is cultivated and the oil extracted, thus, ending the household’s reliance on the traditional energy suppliers. The algae (or Nori) is also perfectly edible, so can be consumed if necessary. Multi purpose algae stirs the architect’s imagination. Labels;nori-Tokyo Designers Week More: http://newsjunkie.bdonline.co.uk/2009/12/21/changing-rooms/

Algae buildings solves Climate issues?

Algae buildings solves Climate issues? The future of green technology is algae-cultivating buildings, synthetic trees, and heaps of white roofs, according to the U.K.’s institution of Mechanical Engineers. Andrew McFaul. Cultivating algae to make liquid fuel is one of the most active areas of study in biofuels. The institution is recommending that algae be amalgamated into buildings so algae can be grown at a big scale. How synthetic trees, which capture carbon from the air, could be deployed alongside wind turbines. Engineers envision that long plastic tubes, called photobioreactors, be integrated into building designs or retrofitted onto existing skyscrapers. Energy Secretary Steven Chu has in public offered this comparatively low-tech approach, which was studied in-depth at the Lawrence Livermore lab last year. The shape of things to come?Climate issues fixed by these a;gae covered buildings. labels:algae -cul tivating buildings- Andrew mcfaul

http://www.readthewriting.com/post/andrew-mcfaul-algae-coated-buildings-touted-as-climate-fix/

OriginOil Reveals Algae Production Model

The National Algae Association’s (NAA) quarterly conference applauded OriginOil’s presentation of a first-ever comprehensive algae production model, developed with the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) of the Department of Energy under its collaborative research agreement with OriginOil.

At the end of the presentation, CEO Eckelberry outlined plans to share this first-ever interactive model for algae production through a process of publishing various calculators on the company’s website and also making the detailed model available to researchers.

Should further stimulate interest in algae to oil prroduction.

Read More: http://bit.ly/8fqiBC

DOE Awards Dynaflow

Dynaflow, Inc., a leader in R&D services and products in fluid dynamics and applied sciences,  that it has been awarded a Department of Energy (DOE) Phase I Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract to develop and demonstrate a new system to extract oil from algae.

The program objective is to contribute to the development and commercialization of cost competitive algae based biofuels that can serve as alternatives to petroleum based fuels.

Dynaflow’s new system utilizes a low-cost, sustainable method that combines the algae harvesting and oil extraction steps. The approach promises greater energy efficiency and scalability than traditional methods for producing biofuels from algae and provides a path to large cost-effective algae based biofuel production.

Read More: http://bit.ly/79ATev